Feathered friends

This entry has been deleted at the request of a copyright owner.

Note to copyright holders: our normal procedure with this site, which isn’t a commercial venture, is to use only very small thumbnails, and always to provide a link to the original.

Wherever possible, we ask for permission to do this. For various reasons, this doesn’t always elicit a response. One reason has been given: “We don’t accept email from unknown sources.” Because of this, where normally permission would be waited for, we do take a view: that if the copyright owner objects, we will be told.

Most copyright holders take the view (which is our own view on matters where we hold copyright) that publicity is good for us, and that a small quote from a small part of our writing or photographic output, linked to one of our pages, is on balance a good deal.

Of course, if a large, powerful and wealthy web site reproduced a photo, or an article or a video, and used it in a prominent way simply to cut outlay on budgets where they could well afford to spend royalties on, we’d see this as different!

This sort of relationship -“you scratch my back, and I’ll link back to yours” works well, and most small web sites are happy to tolerate technical breaches of copyright on the quite reasonable grounds that the rewards for getting primitive about it are nil, and that the advantages may one day be real.

Sadly, lawyers don’t always behave like reasonable humans, and some are known to take the view that “it sets a precedent” and “if you let one do it, others will say…” and so on. We can’t do anything about this viewpoint except say, with regret, that this is most unlikely to be true, but that we aren’t out to start any fights; if you ask us to remove a picture, we will do so.

In exchange, will will promise never, ever, to link to your web site again.

(The page you’re missing here was just a minor illustration of an odd effect of HTML, and the WordPress content management software. It showed a half dozen coloured pictures around two inches in size, with each picture being a bird picked at random from a half dozen web sites. Each picture linked back to the site where we found it, creating traffic (trivial amounts, no doubt) for that site.  A pity, frankly…)

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